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20121027
20121104
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WETA 19
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
very large containers on the floor. i could tell that law enforcement would find them very important and interesting and i was determined to get them in the right place as quickly as i could. >> ryssdal: the boxes did turn out to be both interesting and important. and they eventually ended up in the right place. here, with the commissioner of political practices, in helena, montana. but that's a story-- of secrets and money and politics-- that we'll come back to. first, i need to tell you what's been going on in montana's elections. i got to butte on the fourth of july. on the surface, there was the usual hoopla and fanfare. marching bands, flag twirlers, shriners, mermaids and, of course, politicians of every stripe. >> butte's candidate right here. >> re-elect pat noonan. he's my son. >> ryssdal: but there's something different about this year's campaign. there are new hidden forces at work. nowhere is this more evident than in a barnburner of a race that may well decide which party controls the u.s. senate. with the stakes so high, this race is attracting big money from lots of ou
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
. they passed 26 laws in hundreds of states. they have here a woman who is attacked, called a slut for wanting access to contraception and a candidate that just said, i wouldn't phrased it that way. exactly how would he have phrased it? >> that's a false narrative. >> i don't want to get off the topic of women -- okay. i will give you that time. i want to get to the impact on swing voters so-called by "the new york times" waitress moms and what is this going to do to the pitch battle in ohio, in florida, in virginia for women voters in the united states. >> we see the so-called waitress moms. we love the heart of tagging that. >> fancy that. >> these are women who typically voted for president obama in the last election cycle. but are struggling with, we are struggling economically has he upheld his promise and still don't love romney as an option either. we are seeing and talking about the women's issues, they are family issues. these are household issues. they are economic issues. access to healthcare, access to birth control. how many kids we have, those are economic issues. it's going to c
mother-in-law's from england and there's not a lot of support for her. we started talking about what happens when you get home because here she's been in emergency mode. this is one of the things we talk about, this emergency mode. she's been in emergency mode. there's the premature baby and now there's the hurricane and the adrenaline's flowing and suddenly these going to go home soon and i said sometimes what can happen is you can have some anxiety, even depression, you should expect it. i could hear her voice starting to get shaky on the phone. she said i'm starting to feel that. and so then i very gently sort of suggested you need to talk to your doctor, there are things you can do. there are steps you can take. so we ended up talking about how the follow up was so important because i think in those situations charlie she's so focused on the baby. and on the emergency. and she wasn't really paying attention to her own emotions. of course postpartum anxiety and postpartum depression can be serious. >> rose: what kind of pieces have you been doing since. i saw that parts -- parti
and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honki
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i think i was 12 years old. so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't really even know what that was until i actually got the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going to
indiscriminately and kill a lot of civilians, that's also a violation of international law. >> warner: but the threat of legal action offers no protection to these students, who now dream of what they'll become when they grow up. >> dentist. >> teacher". >> warner: no one can tell them when this war will end, what kind of country they will inherit, and whether they'll live to fulfill those dreams. >> brown: next, immigration may not be a front-burner issue for the presidential candidates right now, but it is something many voters care about in the swing state of iowa. paul yeager of iowa public television reports on how demographic shifts in his state are changing the political landscape. his story is part of our new collaboration with public media partners across the country from areas that will likely determine the outcome of the election in a series we call "battleground dispatches." >> reporter: last fall, in the run up to the republican caucuses, illegal immigration was a hot topic on the campaign trail in iowa. >> if you hire someone who is illegal, we're going to sanction you.
. these are too much. >> i hate to be cynical, but i am skeptical. they were writing the laws. good politicians act on a self interest and what the public demands. one fast point, you mentioned california, and that is where campaign finance matters. most people have a strong view about president obama or mitt romney. where this really has an impact is local but also on state emissions. california has all kinds of stuff on the balanced, because if you have got more money than your opponent, you could win. tavis: joe biden has apparently written a tell-all, and i am told it is not a flattering picture he paints of the vice president. i do not know if that would have any impact. the question is what kind of nose itches -- what kind of buzz is generated. it >> if an idealistic young american comes to washington to change things, but washington changes him. in the process of explaining his story, he takes after his former boss, joe biden, and portrays joe biden in a negative light. it is also a scathing indictment of how washington politics works and how both parties will relate to the business comm
show. i make a joke all the time. one of the gains we had this summer, i looked over common- law and she might have been a 70-year-old caucasian lady next to a black lady, and they were both bobbing. was like, where do you see this? this is great. if you are a hip-hop fan, we are going to play something you like, but we are throwing some re you would not be sitting in front of. tavis: you have done some covers. >> i chose the for the gala, because she can sing anything. -- for layla because she can sing anything. i chose them because it was a perfect couple, and -- perfect cover, and i do not know many people who do that. tavis: this cp is out now. what is next in the agenda? >> i am going to do volume 2, featuring a slew of guests and artists i did not have room on this one for and people i have never worked with, so i am still getting back together -- getting back together -- that together. tavis: you are in los angeles. they are lined up all over the city. if you have just now come to know this brilliant artist, you now know the name, and you should add it to his collection. i
: they will say we're playing by the rules." >> absolutely. those are the rules. it's the law. they are allowed to do that until the law changes they are well within their legal rights to do it. >> brown: so where else? stay with the outside spending playing a big role. where do you see that? >> one state where it's sort of reversed is in indiana where the democratic candidate has been getting more of a benefit. in that state joe donnelly has spent less of his own money on ads than the outside democratic groups so that's another big one. and virginia is huge and i've been told by people who watch these things closely, the people who watch who's up and who's down that it's made a significant difference in virginia the republican candidate george allen has been vastly outspent. i think he's spent about $3 million on ads. outside groups have spent about $14 million on ads and that has allowed him to complete blow for blow with tim cain. >> brown: the interesting other case is massachusetts, lots of money, tons of money but not from outside, right? >> exactly. the two candidates, scott brown and el
that they are providing a benefit and that the benefit is overwhelming common-law -- overwhelming, whatever the risks and down sides are. >> talk about what concerns you about the issue of privacy. i know most doctors do not even communicate with their patient via e-mail. >> that basically tells you the whole problem. 68% of american physicians will not e-mailed their patients. that tells you something, but what we have is the issue of anything digitized is subject to breaches and leaks. this is a problem, because if it is your valuable data, we have already seen that with medical records of some of the top medical centers, so this has to be brought to the lowest level of risk. it is never going to be 0. we have to maximize the impact of having the data that is so portable and useful. it is really a risk benefit story. >> what makes you believe all of ass leads to better how oealth opposed to greater awareness, because they are not the same? >> i am with you, because the big difference is people taking ownership. it is there data information. they did not have access before, so once that happens that
. they know they have to open right away. there is actually a law in the state of florida, also, that if you have more than "x" number of gas stations you have to have a hookup regenerater. so we're prepared here to make sure we can get those things up and running. >> tom: we're talking about states that aren't-- this is the second hurricane in 14 months, but new york, new jersey, delaware, pennsylvania, connecticut, these are not hurricane-prepared states historically speaking. >> historically that's correct. this is pretty resilient people up there, though. >> tom: sure. >> what we are hoping is they local emergency managers did the things they need to do and it will be awhile before we get electricity back. that will be an issue. and we're going have to make sure there is adequate supply of generators to get the key things up and running like our grocery stores, gas stations, hospitals, and make sure we get those upjohn line first. >> you inherited a bee's nest worth of trouble after you came in two weeks after hurricane katrina. how has the agency changed in order to respond to sandy tod
to was economy university. i did it for a year. then two years of law. basically i didn't really know what i wanted to do. and it seemed the right thing that my parents said as long as you study we will pay for everything. so i did this university for three years. and then i had a stint at san diego, california, which is a place that i really adore. but i guess i was looking more for a new york energy and it didn't have it. so i then went to london, 1976, to study kpun cases. i went to california to do international relations then went to london-- it was really just any excuse to be able to be kept by my parents in a way. in london i fell into photography. >> rose: how did you fall into it. >> it's a really funny story. i believe so much that things come to you. and basically i went to a friend's house for lunch and there was a foted owe of himself on his mantle piece. and i said what a great photograph. and he told me this girl studying photography here took it. i said i have always heard of this girl i would love to meet her. i went to meet her at her school. when a rifed if he school she
by federal law rather than the constitution. congress could change that date. there's actually provision for, if a state doesn't get its vote in on time, basically for the state legislature to make a decision about which electors to send to vote for president. so there are actually ways for that to happen. i just don't think anybody is that the a point right now. >> ifill: if you're in massachusetts or connecticut and your constituents don't have power, they're not watching the ads, maybe the voting machines aren't working, sandy could have a more direct effect. >> i think we're going to have to wait for that week. it will have an effect certainly on the candidates' abilities to communicate their messages in the last days. a lot of candidates will hold back money so that they can barrage voters with ads in the last week. some of the candidates that have done this time may find out it wasn't a good idea to husband all that money. perhaps they should have put the money out earlier. obviously nobody could have predicted this. >> ifill: when the people get their power back, they will see ads. >>
data because i live in virginia where the election privacy laws are unusually strict. the best he could do is show me the kind of data he could collect on a hypothetical voter like me. >> wow. the type of clothes that i buy. whether i have a gold card. if i have a pool. if i have a pet. if i'm a nascar fan. veteran. smoker. but why are these details so valuable to the campaign? so do the campaigns care about what kind of car i drive, what kind of music i listen to? >> only if it has to do... if it says something and predicts something about the way you're going on vote. you may not vote republican because you drive a corvette. but there may be a correlation between people who own corvettes and voting behavior. if there is they're going to exploit that correlation and try to find as many corvette owners as they can. >> reporter: the ability to predict voter behavior is what makes all of this data so powerful. once the campaigns collect all of this seemingly random information about us, they feed it into sophisticated mathematical formulas, called algorithms which are used to predict vote
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)